Tag Archives: evolution

The Pulling Force of Evolution

Posted by David

I broke the tip of my finger this week, which has limited my ability to type and has given me a new respect and compassion for those who are disabled in profound ways. My injury has also brought back the memory of a deer leg bone that I once found in a pinyon forest in the foothills of the Sangre de Cristos.

Little flesh remained on this deer leg, but the joints were still intact. It had all the normal number of bones, except the upper leg bone had an ‘extra joint’ which was a bit larger than a baseball. This was a mass of bone growth, hinging a bit, which had developed from a full fracture.

What was truly amazing was how both sides of the fracture had sent calcareous projections toward the other side, like two hands full of fingers grasping at each other. Since the deer had spent much time walking on the injury, the growth never made a full connection, so the mass of bone kept getting bigger and bigger.  How did it die? I can only guess that a mountain lion got it, since I couldn’t find the rest of the skeleton anywhere.

Bodies are truly given an amazing gift of healing, aren’t they?

This idea of growth mechanics being directional and having two sides is important. I think of evolution in particular (the mechanic of gravity also provides an example of another important misconception). In classic and neo-Darwinism, the driving force of evolution mechanics come from the bottom-up, i.e. random mutations and the ‘desire’ for survival in the individual. But not only does the mechanics, the force of evolution, come from a pressure from the bottom part of the equation, but it also comes from a pulling force from the top.  Evolution has both bottom-up and top-down force mechanics. Once side pushes, the other side pull. Traditional evolution seems to be only concerned with the bottom up pressure and disregards the pulling force from the top.

As the deer bone healed, there was growth from one end of the bone to the other. But there was also a pulling force that said in effect, “here I am, your mate, the other end of this bone onto which you must adhere.” The same is the case for the process and driving forces behind evolution.

There is a pulling force from the ‘top’ which says for the jaguar, for example, “Time to become a great forest cat.” Or in the case of a temperate montane forest, the pulling force says, “Time to become a forest of pointed, snow-shedding trees.” Then the genetics, creatures and communities of organisms below respond and evolve into those species characterized by those morphological traits. This is the greatly overlooked aspect of evolution. Evolution is a pulling force rather than a pushing force from below. There is a pushing force from below, but that’s not what drives species directionally into their particular morphology. The pushing force is simply what we call life.

Tragically, this component is overlooked in our high school textbooks. We overlook the Great Pulling Force in science, because that pulling force is the love of God. Modern science won’t accept that kind of force. On the other hand, oddly enough, it will accept ‘randomness’ as a force or ‘chaos’. This is because man does not wish to go toward that great pulling force. All other forms of life grow naturally toward that pulling force, but in the human’s ability to choose, a.k.a. our will, we responds by not growing into that great pulling force, but choose to grow into our own particular egocentric bubble. We grow inward rather than outward toward the pulling force. Jesus came to change our direction of growth.

I’m hoping for a speedy recovery in my finger, that those little filaments of bone are starting their journey across the great gap!

See, I set before you today life and prosperity, death and destruction. For I command you today to love the LORD your God, to walk in obedience to him, and to keep his commands, decrees and laws; then you will live and increase, and the LORD your God will bless you in the land you are entering to possess…Now choose life, so that you and your children may live and that you may love the LORD your God, listen to his voice, and hold fast to him. For the LORD is your life, and he will give you many years in the land he swore to give to your fathers, Abraham, Isaac and Jacob.

Deuteronomy 30:15-20

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The Pride and Prejudice in Evolution

Posted by: David

I’d like to look at evolution based on why it enflames human sensibilities rather than looking too much into the details of the phenomena. The reason why few understand evolution is because of pride and fear in the human heart. Let’s borrow from Jane Austen and call it a pride and prejudice.

Giraffe im Krugerpark in Südafrika

Giraffe im Krugerpark in Südafrika

First let me define evolution as I understand it in one sentence: Evolution is the process whereby a natural system becomes its archetypal form. For instance, the archetypal form for a grazing animal that feeds on the tree leaves is the giraffe morphology. The archetype exists prior to the existence of the giraffe. Throughout the ages, the giraffe morphology has evolved and disappeared from the fossil records from within different groups. We can apply the same principle to all biotic and abiotic forms of existence in the entire universe. It can be applied to you and your body. It can be applied to the earth. There is even an archetypal you and your evolution is the process of you becoming the archetypal you. You, the earth, and the giraffe were defined as archetypes before the beginning of time.

I’m sure I’ve already enflamed some of you, but bear with me. Without getting into more detail on the process, I’d like to look at the psychological response of two sides of the evolution debate. I’ll start with the Christians, since I’m a Christian.

Within some circles of Christians, there is an established group-think that if one doesn’t read the Genesis Chapter 1 and 2 literally, where it ‘should’ be read literally, then one is distorting the Word of God. When we think this, we are being prideful, because we are saying that my interpretation or my circle’s understanding is correct and this places us in a place of power over another, and ironically over God. We may be just going along with what we are taught, and that may not be prideful, but it is prejudice. In this case, we are evaluating (placing judgment) something based on our fears rather than what we know in our heart. The root of prejudice is always fear. It may be a fear of not belonging to a group or it may be a fear that God will strike us down for not thinking correctly. If it’s the former, then so be it. It’s vanity to want to be accepted by others at the expense of truth. If it’s the latter, then we need to get to know God better. We will find out that God is gracious and merciful, especially when we tell him that we don’t understand something. We are not judged based on things we don’t know. However, we are judged by the standards that we expect of others, or place upon others.

In other Christian circles, the opposite is going on in order to please society, “what scientists say is fact.” Their pride and prejudice is getting the best of them also in a similar vein: vanity of the ego and fear of being an outcast.

Now, let’s move on to the general atheistic Darwinian. Sorry about the long term here, I needed to specify the perspective as closely as possible; there are all sorts of variations amongst Darwinian perspectives. Generally, it’s easy to see the pride and prejudice in this group. The prejudice is the most clear. There’s a prejudice toward the exclusion of God as driving force behind the process and a reluctance to ascribe a plan to the outcome of process. The prejudice (once again, a ‘pre-judgment’) is that God is not the impetus, which colors the final analysis. I must add that I believe that the deeper motive here again is fear: “If there is a just God, then, oh, no,” says the unconscious, “I’ll be convicted of this or of that.” In this case, the atheistic Darwinian cannot add God to the equation or the ego would be squashed. But once again, if the atheistic Darwinian would try to get to know God, then he would find the God of grace and mercy.

The ego is also to blame for the pride within this perspective. Man and his innovation must be the first to contemplate evolution. The “it’s mine” concept. So, here again, pride colors and distorts truth.

Mostly though, the whole evolution debate is a red herring. It keeps us fighting and that’s the best way to obscure the truth. During any fight, each side obscures their individual error, and both sides also do an excellent job of concealing and burying the truth that the other does hold dear. Yes, both the atheistic Darwinian and the Genesis-literal Christian have truths to tell. The atheistic Darwinian is witnessing a process of unfolding within the natural world that is very true and very real. The Genesis-literal Christian understands deeply that God is the ruler of a just universe and that he has designed the archetypes before the beginning of time.

But by burying the other side’s truth in their pride and prejudice, each group limits the others ability to see the wonders of God’s creation. We are observing, feeling and perceiving beings. We can understand joy. Besides beautiful human relation, nothing gives me greater joy than looking closely at God’s creation. Why does it give me such joy to think about how ginger is related to a banana or how relatively unchanged a species of fern has been for millions of years or how I am evolving to become the “me” of God’s planning? I cannot fathom.

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